Tag Archives: norwegian

Norwegian Bunad Biscornu Pincushion

The Fourth Norwegian Bunad Biscornu Pincushion

I love the traditional Norwegian patterns for the “bringeduk” because they come in some many different shapes and patterns and on top of that, everything changes depending on the colours you use.

This one is very yellow and I stayed as true to the original colours as I could. Its a very good size and is slightly bigger than my hand. It was a lot of fun to make, although I did stitch like crazy to finish before I leave on vacation in three days.

As always, if you want to buy this pattern so you can make it yourself, please click here to get to my Etsy shop.

The THIRD Norwegian Bunad Biscornu Pincushion

It’s been made clear to me that the frameholder I bought long ago is not working well for me. It might be that my chair is all wrong or that the frameholder is just positioned wrongly regardless of my adjustments. Either way, making 4 different biscornu pincushions in one month certainly left its mark. Or should I say, left a constant pain in my back and neck.

So this will be the last biscornu pincushion for a while as I after all have a vacation coming up aswell. I plan on spending my vacation in Denmark going through antique bookshops and secondhand shops sweeping the kingdom clear of old embroidery work and charts.

So if you really like this pattern (or any of the other ones I’ve posted) you can find the pattern in my shop here

The second Norwegian Bunad Biscornu Pincushion

The second Norwegian Bunad Biscornu Pincushion

My second pincushion in biscornu form is in beautiful shades of purple. Fun fact: My favourite colour is actually purple.

When I came across the original pattern which had been used as a breastcloth (bringeduk), or breastplate if you like, it’s alignement was slightly off and things just didnt not seem to add up in the repetitive pattern it’s supposed to have. That was the first thing I fixed.

I kept all the original colours as I thought they were quite beautiful already and needed “no fixing”. I dare even suggest that they are bold enough to almost make it appear like a modern piece of embroidery rather than a 50 year old one.

It’s size is just between the previous large and small at just 45×45 squares. It was a bit fiddly at times, but I got there in the end.

If you like this pattern and would like to buy it, please visit my shop here.

The basic biscornu shape is easily obtained, you can read the tutorial on how to get it here.

 

The Two-sized Norwegian Biscornu Pincushion Patterns

The Two-sized Norwegian Biscornu Pincushion Patterns

I wanted to incorporate some of the old traditional forms of embroidery from Norway into something fun and quirky. In my humble opinion, biscornu pincushions are loads of fun and quirkness!

So I dug out some old photos of what is called “breastcloth” that is worn with a specific type of folk costume that are usually covered in some kind of bead embroidery and started to reconstruct it piece by piece in order to make a pincushion from it.

The large piece contains all the original colours, which looks amazing. Clearly, I don’t use black often enough in my work. The smaller piece has the original colours, but shifted around in an attempt to give it a more fun / modern look with less black and more bright colours.

The patterns are for sale in my shop here complete with photos and DMC codes.

The small one later became a keychain decoration for my husband. He thinks it’s the cutest thing he’s ever seen.

The Stag, the doe & the Autumn

The Stag, the doe & the autumn – traditional folk embroidery sampler with deer motif

The deer has apparently been my spirit animal for quite some time.

It started when we were testdriving our then new car. A wonderful Ford Mondeo stationwagon which we later named “The Madam”. It was the very first car we bought and we were over the moon. During the test drive, however, a doe running in panic across a field almost crashed into us. But luckily it turned away just in the knick of time.

I never thought much of this incident other than “woo, wildlife!” as I was not used to seeing a lot of the local wildlife despite having lived here half my life.

A couple of years later the Madam sadly couldn’t cope anymore and had to be sent to the everlasting Highway of Heaven.

At this point we were testdriving a Volvo c30. And as we were driving up a hill I’ve driven a thousand times before, all of a sudden a doe is running like a maniac across the road. I look to see where it came from and behold, a stag standing amongst the trees as bewildered and confused like the rest of us.

As we drive on I finally say “Well, now we have to buy the car. The deer has spoken.” And so we did. And we still have the car, and we’ve seen so much wildlife while driving it it’s unbelievable.

A deer is such a beautiful animal and I really loved putting this sampler together.

If you’re interested in buying the pattern you can find it in my shop here!

Svartsaum Duk - a norwegian traditional cloth

Svartsaum Duk – a norwegian traditional cloth (free pattern)

In Norway there is a traditional folk costume called Bunad. They are all different depending on where in the country you might be from, or which one you might think is the prettiest.  Not all of them necessarily have embroideries on them though. There is a Bunad from my county (Vestfold)  which only has weaved ribbons on them in a particular pattern as weaving was traditionally the “big thing” around here.

But in Telemark, as an example, there is a whole variety of embroideries. Everything from cross stitch to freehand/crewel. In Voss, they also have a Bunad which has a headscarf which were white with black embroideries on them.

It’s from those two places I reconstructed some patterns  to create this piece. On a large scale it can be a table cloth, on a small scale it can be a rather decorative pillow.

I stitched my piece in 2-3 shades of mustard yellow, because I hate mustard yellow and I need to have less of it.