Tag Archives: shop

Chinese Traditional Folk Floral Mandala

Chinese Traditional Folk Floral Mandala is a cross stitch pdf pattern recreated from a museum piece which is believed to have been first created between 1850-1900 in Western China. Originally embroidered with blue thread on unbleached linen.

I’ve been coming down with a nasty fever, but as I slowly wait for it to past I have not exactly been lazy. I came across an embroidered panel at the Museum of Fine Arts (Boston) and decided to see if I could make something out of it.

The different roundels on it are absolutely amazing and I hope I did it justice.

If you like this pattern you can find it in my shop.

Chinese Traditional Folk Embroidery Carp Motif

So I know I originally said “Scandinavian embroidery”, but there is so many beautiful things out there it seems like a shame to restrict one self.

This beautiful carp roundel was made somewhere between 1880-1920 as part of a wedding valance in the Yunnan province of China. It had four other roundel motifs on it which I might reconstruct as well.

Evidently, the carp lays quite a lot of eggs and are therefore a symbolism for fertility.

All the same, I’m quite happy with how it ended up and you can find it in my shop here

Norwegian Bunad Biscornu Pincushion

The Fourth Norwegian Bunad Biscornu Pincushion

I love the traditional Norwegian patterns for the “bringeduk” because they come in some many different shapes and patterns and on top of that, everything changes depending on the colours you use.

This one is very yellow and I stayed as true to the original colours as I could. Its a very good size and is slightly bigger than my hand. It was a lot of fun to make, although I did stitch like crazy to finish before I leave on vacation in three days.

As always, if you want to buy this pattern so you can make it yourself, please click here to get to my Etsy shop.

The THIRD Norwegian Bunad Biscornu Pincushion

It’s been made clear to me that the frameholder I bought long ago is not working well for me. It might be that my chair is all wrong or that the frameholder is just positioned wrongly regardless of my adjustments. Either way, making 4 different biscornu pincushions in one month certainly left its mark. Or should I say, left a constant pain in my back and neck.

So this will be the last biscornu pincushion for a while as I after all have a vacation coming up aswell. I plan on spending my vacation in Denmark going through antique bookshops and secondhand shops sweeping the kingdom clear of old embroidery work and charts.

So if you really like this pattern (or any of the other ones I’ve posted) you can find the pattern in my shop here

Swedish Rhombus Folk Embroidery pdf pattern with birds in cross stitch

Swedish Rhombus Folk Embroidery pdf pattern with birds in cross stitch

Instead of working on my next biscornu pincushion, which is halfway complete, I decided to take a nosedive into Swedish Museums. A bit for inspiration, but mostly to procrastinate.

Several hours later I suddenly found myself finishing up a newly drawn pattern from all the traditional headscarves I came across. They came in so many different varieties and all in some form of blackwork. And I love that because it’s also very similar to the traditional head scarves that some Norwegian folk costumes use as well.

I quite like the rhombus shape and for fun I also mixed some colours up to see what it could look like in a two-tone. I wasn’t disappointed. I think it actually looks best as two-tone. But that’s just how I feel about it.

Swedish Rhombus Folk Embroidery pdf pattern with birds in cross stitch

If you would like to buy this pattern please click here

The second Norwegian Bunad Biscornu Pincushion

The second Norwegian Bunad Biscornu Pincushion

My second pincushion in biscornu form is in beautiful shades of purple. Fun fact: My favourite colour is actually purple.

When I came across the original pattern which had been used as a breastcloth (bringeduk), or breastplate if you like, it’s alignement was slightly off and things just didnt not seem to add up in the repetitive pattern it’s supposed to have. That was the first thing I fixed.

I kept all the original colours as I thought they were quite beautiful already and needed “no fixing”. I dare even suggest that they are bold enough to almost make it appear like a modern piece of embroidery rather than a 50 year old one.

It’s size is just between the previous large and small at just 45×45 squares. It was a bit fiddly at times, but I got there in the end.

If you like this pattern and would like to buy it, please visit my shop here.

The basic biscornu shape is easily obtained, you can read the tutorial on how to get it here.

 

The Two-sized Norwegian Biscornu Pincushion Patterns

The Two-sized Norwegian Biscornu Pincushion Patterns

I wanted to incorporate some of the old traditional forms of embroidery from Norway into something fun and quirky. In my humble opinion, biscornu pincushions are loads of fun and quirkness!

So I dug out some old photos of what is called “breastcloth” that is worn with a specific type of folk costume that are usually covered in some kind of bead embroidery and started to reconstruct it piece by piece in order to make a pincushion from it.

The large piece contains all the original colours, which looks amazing. Clearly, I don’t use black often enough in my work. The smaller piece has the original colours, but shifted around in an attempt to give it a more fun / modern look with less black and more bright colours.

The patterns are for sale in my shop here complete with photos and DMC codes.

The small one later became a keychain decoration for my husband. He thinks it’s the cutest thing he’s ever seen.

The Stag, the doe & the Autumn

The Stag, the doe & the autumn – traditional folk embroidery sampler with deer motif

The deer has apparently been my spirit animal for quite some time.

It started when we were testdriving our then new car. A wonderful Ford Mondeo stationwagon which we later named “The Madam”. It was the very first car we bought and we were over the moon. During the test drive, however, a doe running in panic across a field almost crashed into us. But luckily it turned away just in the knick of time.

I never thought much of this incident other than “woo, wildlife!” as I was not used to seeing a lot of the local wildlife despite having lived here half my life.

A couple of years later the Madam sadly couldn’t cope anymore and had to be sent to the everlasting Highway of Heaven.

At this point we were testdriving a Volvo c30. And as we were driving up a hill I’ve driven a thousand times before, all of a sudden a doe is running like a maniac across the road. I look to see where it came from and behold, a stag standing amongst the trees as bewildered and confused like the rest of us.

As we drive on I finally say “Well, now we have to buy the car. The deer has spoken.” And so we did. And we still have the car, and we’ve seen so much wildlife while driving it it’s unbelievable.

A deer is such a beautiful animal and I really loved putting this sampler together.

If you’re interested in buying the pattern you can find it in my shop here!

Geometric Mandala No 1

Geometric Mandala No. 1 – a modern cross stitch pattern

So I was watching True Blood.
I’ve seen parts of it before, but I was trying to binge because there were various parts I hadn’t seen before and provided me with a bit of context for things that was happening by the time I originally started watching.

During this time I was just playing with graph paper and some Staedtler pens I usually use for my bookcoloring.

And thus the Geometric Mandala No. 1 was created. I figured it looked too quirky to not stitch and see how it turns out.

If you like the Mandala, it’s now available in my shop here

Zealand Birds

Zealand Birds – Traditional Danish sampler in cross stitch

On the island Zealand there are two distinct types of embroidery. One is called Hedebo embroidery. Hedebo embroidery covers several forms of white embroidery which originated in the Hedebo (heathland) region of Zealand, Denmark, in the 1760s. The varied techniques which evolved over the next hundred years in the farming community were subsequently developed by the middle classes until around 1820. They were applied to articles of clothing such as collars and cuffs but were also used to decorate bed linen.

The other type of embroidery was Skovbo  and had its only peak in the mid-19th century before almost disappearing. The referance “Skovbo” meant it was tribute to the woodland areas of Zealand, Denmark. They were in two-tone colours (red & blue) with a variety of sampler motifs.

I’ve dawn up 2 samplers with this Skovbo technique in mind, both featuring birds as Zealand also has a very rich variety in birds. The second version includes poetry by John Keats.

You can find it in my shop here